Class Policy

1:1 Now What? – Presenting at ISTE 2018

As I head into the last month of school I begin to think about what I will work on this summer to improve my classroom next year. Teaching and learning are always connected, to improve our teaching skills we must continue to be learners ourselves.

I’m looking forward to presenting and learning at ISTE in Chicago this year. I’m sure it will be a whirlwind of excitement and a cacophony of greetings with a wealth of warm exchanges while meeting new educators from around the country.

This year I will be presenting with my colleague, “We’re 1:1, Now What? Maximizing Student Learning in 1:1 Environment.” We look forward to sharing what we have learned utilizing the digital advantages of 1:1 devices in our classroom and also how to manage student distractions from being online. As a Microsoft Showcase School, we are familiar with being on the cutting edge of educational technology and the wealth of opportunities it can bring for student and educator communication and collaboration. We are also keenly aware that working in a digital environment with students takes classroom management skills and tools to make lessons run smoothly with technology being the digital accelerator to learning.

International School – Bellevue WA 

To learn more about our ISTE 2018 session –  http://bit.ly/1to1NowWhat

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ISTE ’17 Reflections – behind the scenes

I just attended, and presented, at my first International Society for Technology in Education conference, or ISTE for short, in San Antonio.  It was a Texas-sized conference with a ginormous amount of educational technology connections, learning opportunities, and inspiration. Because educators are passionate people, when we all gather in one place to celebrate learning we also inspire others to do more. It was an intensely energizing experience.

Now that it is done, it is time to decompress, unwind, and reflect on all the learning and all I have to share. My ponderings of ISTE begin with the following;

  • Presenting and what I learned about confidence, trial, and error
  • Conferences are a confluence of being hungry, having to pee, and google maps, while pressing through it all to learn
  • Being in tune with the mantra of “My Tribe” and “Teachers are wizards and ISTE is Hogwarts”
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Ready for ISTE!

Sunday Teach Meet

One of the cool things about being part of an educator network is learning about opportunities to both present and learn. One such opportunity was the “Teach Meet” on pre-conference Sunday. It was set up in a relaxed format of 2, 7, and 20-minute teacher-driven presentations on a variety of topics. All were informative, insightful, and relevant. It felt like a teacher learning oasis before the all-encompassing chaotic din of professional learning.

ISTE Teach Meet

I presented my science classes’ work with “Cubes in Space” in a 2-minute spot and it was amazing. I could share what the “Cubes” program is and how my students have a participated this past year. It was an awesome ISTE icebreaker for me.

Later, when I sat in the audience, I picked up some cool tech tips and tools, all low pressure and teacher-tested and applicable to me. I was encouraged to “tell our story” as a school with social media, because if we don’t, who will? I heard about the ed-tech classroom goodness of Flipgrid and Lifeliqe, both of which I have used in my classroom this year, confirming how awesome these tools are with students. In addition, I met some good “table neighbor” teachers from Ohio to California and in our short chats we all shared the same passion and excitement to learn more so as to help our students learn more. I will most definitely consider adding future Teach Meets to any future conference agendas.

Microsoft Partner App Facebook Live

Since my colleague and I were presenting Class Policy, a Microsoft partner application, we were invited to participate in a Facebook Live interview with Anthony Salcito, VP of Worldwide Education at Microsoft. It was fascinating to watch the preparation and planning necessary to highlight a variety of applications including Ohbot, Lego Robotics, Class Policy, and Lifeliqe, among others. Truthfully, it was a bit stressful to be on “live,” especially when the network feed dropped and we needed to record our interview a second time. Overall, it was an honor to be on the Expo floor discussing Class Policy, an absolutely indispensable 1 to 1 device classroom management technology tool.

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Chatting about Class Policy with Anthony Salcito

Microsoft Education Partner App Live

Connected Classroom poster session

In every conference, there are a variety of methods to disseminate information. At ISTE we were fortunate to have a poster session for our “Connected Classroom” presentation on the benefits of being connected with both Microsoft Teams and Class Policy. My colleague, Tamara Traux, and I divided and conquered the two tools, presenting and answering a myriad of questions from grateful teachers and administrators from all over the country. Some needed to know the basics of using OneNote and others needed to pick our brains about how best to maximize Teams to promote class collaboration and conversations. Meanwhile, others wanted to understand how best to manage students being on task with Class Policy and facilitating within a 1 to 1 device environment. It was an intense 2 hours of talking, but I absolutely loved the real-time interactions of sharing classroom technology.

ISTE Resources – Connected Classroom

Hack the Classroom

Microsoft Education hosted an online event to showcase a variety of the latest technology in the classroom where short “ignite” style presentations on topics such as Minecraft Education, Code Builder, and Paint 3D were streamed live. Participating as a live audience was pretty cool. Again, I find the behind the scenes fascinating, but realizing how truly authentic, caring, and empowering these educators are to their students was awe-inspiring. I loved Cathy Cheo-Isaacs’ authentic talk about using Minecraft Education and Code Builder with younger students to help build their understanding of computational thinking. I giggled with her obvious love of Hello Kitty and using the code builder agent to quickly build within a student Minecraft world. I was also inspired by Paul Kercal, the creator and artist behind Paint 3D. To build a tool that allows a student to visualize, think and create in 3 dimensions is mind boggling. He said it well, when he said, “I stepped back and let students be brilliant.” That is the essence of a master teacher, especially one teaching with technology.

Hack the Classroom Live

1 in 3 ISTE session

In this “listen and learn” session, teachers sharing their best technology integration moments in a quick 3 minutes, my colleague, Tamara Truax, was inspired to share her student’s journey project. She promoted the idea that they could and should amplify their family’s migration stories. Tamara shared how teachers can help students amplify their voices through technology. I was proud to be the support system to help amplify this teacher’s voice to encourage other teachers to do the same for their students’ voices.

Connections

 Finally, it was the connections at ISTE that made ISTE so valuable. Conferences are an excellent opportunity to foster a professional network as there so many passionate educators to share ideas and stories with and make those connections. I am fortunate to be part of an awesome educator network in the Microsoft Innovated Educator Experts or #MIEExperts. We use social media to stay connected regularly, but meeting in person and catching up is electrifying. We are extremely passionate about teaching, technology, and advancing student learning and voice and our conversations stem from wanting to hear about new teaching techniques, tools and tips. We are nerds, geeks, and wizards. The keynote by Jennie Magiera, chief innovation officer at Des Plaines Public Schools in Chicago, was spot-on when she said, “teachers are wizards and ISTE is Hogwarts.” A teacher’s PLC, or professional learning network, is their tribe, the people who get “it,” the passionate drive to promote what is best for student learning. They invigorate and energize us. We need them and ISTE is our gathering place. I am so glad I went and I look forward to returning in the future. ISTE was my Hogwarts and though I’m now on summer break, I am also so ready to return to school in the fall.

Connected Classroom – ISTE 2017

In a few weeks my colleague and I will traveling to San Antonio to present at ISTE.

We’re excited to share how we utilize classroom technology in a 2 hour poster session. We’ll share how OneNote, Microsoft Classroom (now Microsoft Teams for Education), and Class Policy helps to foster student collaboration and conversation.

Connected Classroom: Digital Conversations & Collaboration with Microsoft Classroom & Class Policy

Monday, June 26, 2:00-4:00 pm
HBGCC Tower View Lobby, Table 24

Cheryl McClure and  Tamara Truax
Learn how to utilize Microsoft Classroom and Class Policy to foster online student conversations, OneNote for lesson collaboration and connected assignments in Outlook. Suitable for those already familiar with OneNote but accessible to all as an introduction to the collective collaboration of a central digital space for connected learning.

ISTE sessionConnected Classroom

 

 

Fostering Project Collaborative Learning

My middle school science classes often just blow me away with their creativity and energy. To capture this, I strive to foster collaborative and creative projects. Specifically, this year, I have been setting up science projects that require students to productively function in teams, more specifically to shine within a team.

Project 1 – Step 1

For the first big group project, I offered students their choice of medium to create a weather “lesson.” Although there was choice in presentation, the group worked in a traditional project team. The students were excited to try out new tech for an audio-visual “Ted-Ed” style weather lesson, but without specific work to coach the soft skills of team collaboration, there were the usual pitfalls of who does what work, how much work, and whether the work was of good quality. The product of the “lessons” was amazing in the style and variety of creativity, but the downside was we didn’t work on improving how the team collaborative functions.

Project 2 – Step 2

The next big group project team experience gave us the reason for the next step in team collaboration a “Team Contract.” Students were to write a proposal for a small cube experiment to travel on a space flight. As students choose their teams, I asked them to review, discuss, and define their requirements to be a successfully functioning team. When we had group class time to work on our “Cubes in Space” projects, students referred to their Team Contract when a team member didn’t meet their work requirements. Students began to hone the essential skills of collaboration and communication that are so vital in our everyday world.

Project 3 – Step 3

Our current project, an Earth Safety Challenge PSA, takes all of the above and moves it beyond team collaboration to group creativity. Students initially completed background research on local earth science events such as earthquakes, volcanoes, and tsunamis. Students were grouped into 3 large “company” teams based on their research area. Their task is to create a company and assign the roles of research scientists, engineers, media specialists, and project managers. Their job is to create a Public Service Announcement (PSA) to inform the public about the science and safety of their assigned earth event. This project is majority student designed and managed. Students are using a variety of skills, research, technology, modeling, communication, collaboration, and creativity. I am so impressed with their level of positive engagement, motivation, and the direction of each company team to produce a creative and effective earth science PSA. Although I can’t wait to the see the final products, I am already extremely proud of the collaborative learning in which these students are engaged.

Lesson Details If you’re interested in the specifics of our Earth Safety Challenge Project, please see my lesson plans here: Earth Safety Challenge Project Lesson Plan

Lesson technology – for this project we utilized the following technology;

Since we are a 1:1 school (students are issued district laptops for the school year), we are comfortable with utilizing technology in our classroom. Class notes, agendas, and group project work is all conducted in OneNote. The final Earth Safety Challenge PSA will be posted in Docs.com for other grade level science classes to review and offer feedback. We also use Class Policy to group team members and monitor technology on task time. Modeling in Minecraft is an awesome way for students to use their analytic thinking in a creative format to make a 3D model – of anything. Making use of student voice was easy with FlipGrid and Forms. FlipGrid offers accessible technology for students to video respond and reply, it is fun and informative. Forms provides an easy means to access or survey online, providing accessible data to share. My students are using a variety of tech tools to make their PSA presentations, including PowerPoint, Office Mix, Sway, and video, to be posted in class collections in Docs.com. If used appropriately, technology can enable and amplify student knowledge and voice on any project. Totally amazing collaboration.