My Science of Blogging or rather my blogging of science

#EdublogsClub – short #1

This post is part of the #EdublogsClub – a group of educators and educational technology enthusiasts that blog around a common theme each week. Simply write a post and share it (via social media w/ #edublogsclub or posting a link as a comment to that topic’s posting on the Edublogger site) to join in, or sign up to receive email reminders of each new prompt.

Why Blog?

I believe teaching is a skill, a craft, and an art. Teaching is also social, we need to share and learn from others. Blogging is one way to do just that, share what we do and learn from others and that’s why I blog.

A while ago I gave myself a personal challenge of writing about what I do in a blog, specifically what I do in the classroom. I am curious about many things and ideas and I believe it is vital, as educators, that we challenge ourselves to grow intellectually, professionally, and skillfully in the art of teaching.

I teach middle school science and occasionally high school biology. I get a kick of my students’ energy, enthusiasm, and questions, particularly the questions! I know many of my students may not pursue a career in science, but if I can help them grow their brains to think scientifically and critically, then I will have fulfilled a fundamental goal as a science teacher.

Goals to Blog By

Although I have challenged myself to write a science blog, it is often difficult to find time to write. There are always a myriad of other things that need to be done first, such as lesson plans, labs to set up, son’s soccer games, sleep, groceries… and the list goes on. When I came across the Edublog Club Challenge, it seemed like a good opportunity for some motivational reframing and getting back on track to write. My goal is to utilize the weekly blog prompts to build my routine to blog. I’m interested in learning from others. I want to share my stories about science teaching and reflecting on technology and learning. As educators we know all too well, if you can break it down and explain it simply then you have mastered the content of what you are teaching. Or more simply put, sharing is caring.

 

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2 comments

  1. Hi Cheryl

    Welcome to the Edublogs Club!

    Your statement “I know many of my students may not pursue a career in science, but if I can help them grow their brains to think scientifically and critically, then I will have fulfilled a fundamental goal as a science teacher.” really resonates with me.

    I have a Bachelor in Science and worked in the aquaculture industry for much of my life. I’m no longer involved in a science field however being able to think scientifically, critically and question everything continue to be essential to the work I do. Although sometimes my husband wishes I didn’t question everything as much as I do 🙂

    @suewaters

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Looking forward to hearing more from a fellow science teacher–I taught science for 8 years in an at-risk alternative high school before becoming a middle school librarian.

    Liked by 1 person

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